What we want

What Israelis want

The ultra-Orthodox Israelis want to continue receiving state subsidies, while at the same time not sharing the burden of creating the means for those subsidies: serving in the army, doing national service, or entering the workforce. The haredim want to be left alone.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu wants the ultra-Orthodox to serve in the army or do national service, and at the same time, he doesn’t want to burn his political bridges to the ultra-Orthodox parties. Bibi wants the political support of Shas and UTJ after the next elections in 18 months time, while at the same time, wanting them to acquiesce now and draft their young flock into the army. Bibi wants to buy [their support now] and not pay for it later [when they refuse to support him].
But the religious parties are in a bind: if they don’t support Bibi now, and refuse to support him later, and because of them, somebody else becomes prime minister [say Shelly Yechimovich], will they support her? Will she support them? The truth is that the religious parties have no better alternative to Binyamin Netanyahu, and they know it.

Bibi set up a committee to deliver recommendations to replace the Tal Law because he wanted to show the public that he was taking its concerns to heart, and because he wants to increase the workforce. But as soon as he saw that the committee was coming up with serious conclusions that would endanger his coalition, he set up a secret committee, made up of his close aides and the heads of the religious parties, to make sure that no serious recommendations are made that could endanger his coalition. Bibi wants slow, small, and steady reform. He doesn’t want sudden, structural changes. King Bibi, as Time Magazine called him, is supremely happy being Israel’s Supreme Leader with 94 Knesset votes, a mammoth coalition. He wants to keep this going. He does not want to become Prince Bibi, Count Bibi, or even Duke Bibi.

Similar to the haredim, the Arab-Israelis want equality at all levels, but do not want to take part in equal service at all levels. They won’t serve in the army and they won’t carry out national service. They want the state to treat them as equals, but they refuse to take part in any official capacity with anything associated with the state. They want all the rights without any of the responsibilities.

The majority of Israelis – taxpaying, army serving, secular worker bees – want the haredim and the Arabs to start carrying their share of the burden. The haredim and the Arabs want the status quo to continue. They want to be given everything and left alone.

Meanwhile, the settlers want to ‘redeem’ all the land of Judea and Samaria beyond the Green Line, and either expel the Palestinians living there, or live with them in a binational state. The settlers who built their homes on private Palestinian land want the courts to recognize the legality of their purchases. And if the courts won’t do that, the settlers want their politicians to come up with a law that overrules the courts, and makes their purchases legal. If that doesn’t happen either, and the government is forced to remove the illegally built homes, it will chop them up into 100 bits each and reconstruct them on state-owned land. The government does not want to do this again, ever, so it is setting up a committee to determine anew what is considered legal and illegal land beyond the Green Line, as the previous report [drafted by left-winger Talia Sasson] is abhorrent to the current government [even though Sasson's report was commissioned by a Likud government under Ariel Sharon]. The settlers want to be left alone.

The social protest leaders want the middle class to come out into the streets this summer and demand a revolution. The country’s middle class, like all middle classes, doesn’t want a revolution. It wants slow and steady reform; it wants the government to get to work on equalizing the burden and alleviating the high cost of living here. The middle class definitely does not want the windows of its banks broken down – it has accounts in these banks.

The majority of Israelis want the Americans to destroy Iran’s nuclear program ASAP. If that doesn’t happen, they want the Americans not to get in our way when we try to do it. And once we’re doing it, the Israelis want the Americans to help us finish the job and stick with us through whatever happens next.

The Israelis want the new Egyptian president, the leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, to keep the peace and clean up the Sinai. In the meantime, the Israelis want the government to beef up the army in the south and prepare for the worst: a scenario in which terrorists attack us from the Sinai and we can’t chase them back into Egyptian territory, in case we set off a war with the new Egyptian government. The Israelis in the south want the government to once and for all rid Hamas of its ability to fire rockets. The government wants to do this, but is worried about the reaction of Egypt’s new president.

This is all what all the Israelis want. Give it to us. We’re not asking for much.

0 thoughts on “What Israelis want

  1. Basically, like all decent humans: Israelis want stability. And considering what the populace of the vast majority of the world’s nations want…what Israel’s want is tiny. As usual. Shalom. Well written.

  2. What the heck is the point of having a (super) strong coalition if Bibi’s not going to do anything with it? Wasn’t the media’s conclusion that now he *can* finally make strong changes to lessen the ultra-Orthodox’s grip on this country because he can survive them leaving the coalition? What a waste.

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